A clinical lab professional holding a tablet with an easily-generated, comprehensive, and clinically interpretable report of NGS data for a patient with rare cancer.
Your lab can perform high quality variant interpretation that is up-to-date, consistent, and professional using the clinical decision support software.
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Want to Improve Your Lab’s Variant Interpretation for Cancers?

Make faster and better clinical decisions using a comprehensive digital solution to interpret clinical genomics data

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Today's Clinical Lab

Today’s Clinical Lab is a reader-centric publication that keeps clinical professionals up to date with today’s rapidly changing lab industry with in-depth and timely editorial content and resources, including clinical...

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Published:Aug 29, 2022
|Updated:Aug 31, 2022
|3 min read

The future of precision oncology rests largely in molecular profiling. With the development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods, it’s never been easier to identify multiple cancer-associated genomic changes within an individual patient’s tumor. Understanding these changes sets the stage for developing individualized treatments.

How can somatic NGS tests be analyzed and interpreted?

There are four emerging molecular profiling trends in how somatic NGS test are being analyzed and interpreted, including 

  • liquid biopsies,
  • comprehensive genomic profiling,
  • long-read sequencing, and
  • integrated analysis of germline and somatic variants.
A clinical lab professional holding a tablet with an easily-generated, comprehensive, and clinically interpretable report of NGS data for a patient with rare cancer.

Interpreting data poses a particular challenge. Dan Richards, PhD, explains how your lab can perform high quality variant interpretation that is up-to-date, consistent, and professional using the QCI Interpret One clinical decision support software.

Download this eBook to learn about emerging profiling trends and clinical decision making for precision oncology using a comprehensive database, courtesy of QIAGEN.


How can you effortlessly generate diagnostics reports of patient NGS data that are clinically interpretable?

Understanding the patient's genetic profile is crucial, particularly for rare cancers where biological and clinical knowledge is still lacking. As a genomics lab, you may be spending considerable time and effort generating diagnostic reports that are clinically interpretable. 

Instead, your lab could benefit from fully automated analyses of patients' profiles using comprehensive software. QCI Interpret One is a clinical decision making software that does the following:

Clinical professionals discuss patient's genomic profile, including rare cancer variants that will determine their therapeutic approach.
  • transparently collates information about variants from various databases,
  • reliably annotates variants,
  • curates information manually through clinical experts to aid interpretation,
  • includes suggestions on whether germline genetic testing is needed, and
  • allows for customizable reports based on the information being sought.

Download this Application Note to learn how to easily generate diagnostics reports for rare cancers using a comprehensive database curated by real experts, courtesy of QIAGEN.


How can you comprehensively but easily discern biological relevance of the detected variants for clinical decision making?

An illustration of a cancer cell to represent individual variants in rare cancers with varying biological relevance.

A thorough understanding of the data about individual variants illuminates the biological relevance and therapeutic actionability in rare cancers. Powerful software like QCI Interpret One can thus aid clinical decision making, including determining the prognosis, diagnosis, and therapeutic options available for individuals with rare cancers.

Download this Application Note to learn the details of how to use a comprehensive database curated by real experts for clinical decision making in rare cancers, courtesy of QIAGEN.