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Webinar

Insights on Imposter Syndrome for Self-Understanding

Presented by Alison Foo, MSc,PMP

Now Available on Demand!

Imposter syndrome or, more appropriately, imposter phenomena, can negatively affect people’s personal and professional lives. Studies have shown that up to 75% of women experience imposter phenomenon in the workplace. Research also shows that nonbinary people are more likely to be impacted by imposter phenomenon compared to women. Of most relevance, the highest rates of imposter phenomenon are found in the science and pharmaceutical industries. 

In this webinar, I will share insights from my own experience with imposter phenomenon to help you better understand yourself and challenge thoughts of self-doubt. 

After attending this webinar, you will learn: 

  •  The meaning and complexity of imposter phenomenon

  •  Root causes of imposter phenomenon, including childhood experiences and systemic discrimination 

  •  Simple everyday strategies for combating imposter phenomenon

This event was part of the 2024 Women in Leadership Digital Forum on April 2, 2024. View the complete event agenda to this one-day virtual event celebrating women's achievements in leadership!

SPEAKER 

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Alison Foo, MSc, PMP

Alison Foo is a career, communication and leadership coach. She’s passionate about changing lives through teaching professional skills. She has worked with graduate students, newcomers, marginalized groups, and professionals from various industries. Her specialty is the clinical and research sectors.

Alison is also a clinical research professor. She teaches at Seneca College, McMaster University Continuing Education, and ACCES Employment. Previously, she worked on all phases of clinical trials and specialized in clinical trial management, clinical data management, clinical monitoring, and stakeholder management. When she’s not working or volunteering, she’s spending time with her rescue dog, watching Asian TV, and saving recipes she’ll never use.